Saturday, May 7, 2011

Attachment Theory

What is Attachment?

Attachment is an emotional bond to another person. Psychologist John Bowlby was the first attachment theorist, describing attachment as a "lasting psychological connectedness between human beings" (Bowlby, 1969, p. 194). Bowlby believed that the earliest bonds formed by children with their caregivers have a tremendous impact that continues throughout life. According to Bowlby, attachment also serves to keep the infant close to the mother, thus improving the child's chances of survival.

The central theme of attachment theory is that mothers who are available and responsive to their infant's needs establish a sense of security. The infant knows that the caregiver is dependable, which creates a secure base for the child to then explore the world.

Characteristics of Attachment

  • Safe Haven: When the child feel threatened or afraid, he or she can return to the caregiver for comfort and soothing.

  • Secure Base: The caregiver provides a secure and dependable base for the child to explore the world.

  • Proximity Maintenance: The child strives to stay near the caregiver, thus keeping the child safe.

  • Separation Distress: When separated from the caregiver, the child will become upset and distressed.

Ainsworth's "Strange Situation"

In her 1970's research, psychologist Mary Ainsworth expanded greatly upon Bowlby's original work. Her groundbreaking "Strange Situation" study revealed the profound effects of attachment on behavior. In the study, researchers observed children between the ages of 12 and 18 months as they responded to a situation in which they were briefly left alone and then reunited with their mothers (Ainsworth, 1978).

Based upon the responses the researchers observed, Ainsworth described three major styles of attachment: secure attachment, ambivalent-insecure attachment, and avoidant-insecure attachment. Later, researchers Main and Solomon (1986) added a fourth attachment style called disorganized-insecure attachment based upon their own research. A number of studies since that time have supported Ainsworth's attachment styles and have indicated that attachment styles also have an impact on behaviors later in life.

Characteristics of Attachment

Characteristics of Secure Attachment
  • Securely attached children exhibit distress when separated from caregivers and are happy when their caregiver returns. Remember, these children feel secure and able to depend on their adult caregivers. When the adult leaves, the child may be upset but he or she feels assured that the parent or caregiver will return.

  • When frightened, securely attached children will seek comfort from caregivers. These children know their parent or caregiver will provide comfort and reassurance, so they are comfortable seeking them out in times of need.

Characteristics of Ambivalent Attachment
  • Ambivalently attached children usually become very distressed when a parent leaves. This attachment style is considered relatively uncommon, affecting an estimated 7-15% of U.S. children. Research suggests that ambivalent attachment is a result of poor maternal availability. These children cannot depend on their mother (or caregiver) to be there when the child is in need.

Characteristics of Avoidant Attachment
  • Children with an avoidant attachment tend to avoid parents or caregivers. When offered a choice, these children will show no preference between a caregiver and a complete stranger. Research has suggested that this attachment style might be a result of abusive or neglectful caregivers. Children who are punished for relying on a caregiver will learn to avoid seeking help in the future.

Problems with Attachment

What happens to children who do not form secure attachments? Research suggests that failure to form secure attachments early in life can have a negative impact on behavior in later childhood and throughout the life. Children diagnosed with oppositional-defiant disorder (ODD), conduct disorder (CD), or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) frequently display attachment problems, possibly due to early abuse, neglect, or trauma. Clinicians suggest that children adopted after the age of six months have a higher risk of problems with attachment.

While attachment styles displayed in adulthood are not necessarily the same as those seen in infancy, research suggests that early attachments can have a serious impact on later relationships. For example, those who are securely attached in childhood tend to have good self-esteem, strong romantic relationships, and the ability to self-disclose to others.

20 comments:

  1. sounds right, maybe overanalzying it

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  2. Insightful. I always knew there were studies particularly focused on this subject.

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  3. This explains a lot about myself actually. :\ Makes sense though.

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  4. Interesting, attachment is a natural thing in life, great to have it or else I won't be here.

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  5. I only have a few attachments really, my dad being my biggest one. Good read though.

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  6. Hmm... Thanks for the info. Knew a little bit about this but alot of this is new. Nice post.

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  7. I'am more the solo person. The only thing that I'am attached to is probably my mother and the nature. Don't care about the rest at all.

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  8. wow, what a hell of a read, was definitely interesting, thx :)

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  9. Man that's in depth, was really interesting though!

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  10. Very interesting! never knew this ;D

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  11. Interesting read, gives me a lot to think about.

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  12. this is interesting! thanks for sharing

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  13. Awesome article man; I got problems when people invade my intimate proximity space as well ;p

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  14. followed

    this should help me in my psychology course

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  15. I took a psych class and it was very interesting!

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  16. This is really deep. Very interesting!
    How to Hack Life.

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